DEFINITIONS




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ROMANCE DEFINITIONS

Updated 5 Aug 2003 over 26 Kilobytes of text, may load slowly
Copyright 2003 by Magic Dragon Multimedia. All rights reserved Worldwide. May not be reproduced without permission. May be posted electronically provided that it is transmitted unaltered, in its entirety, and without charge.

Romance Definitions: A

Agent: the Agent finds and negotiates a contract between author and publisher. Airport Bookshops: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites where 2% of romance readers purchase books. American West: see Romance Subgenres Amusement: "...the literature we read for amusement or purely for pleasure may have the greatest influence upon us." [T. S. Eliot] Anthology: a book consisting of a collection of stories, typically by different authors. Attractiveness: #3 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroines about whom they read (in 2002), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, beauty, handsomeness, kindness, muscle bound, and strength of character. Author: the author writes the manuscript that becomes the book. See ROMANCE Authors Table of Contents. Author: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #4 most important selling point for readers when deciding what book to buy. See also: description on the back cover, word-of-mouth, Personal flip-through, price.

Romance Definitions: B

"Beauty is only skin deeep." Or is it? Beauty: #2 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroine about whom they read (in 1998), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, attractiveness, handsomeness, kindness, muscle bound, and strength of character. Book: Books are the final printed objects that publishers release, from the manuscripts sold to them by authors. The kinds of books that the Romance industry are interested in include: anthologies, single-title romances, series romances. Book clubs: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the way that 9% of romance readers purchase books. Book Store: one of several types of retail outlets where a reader buys one or more books.

Romance Definitions: C

Children: may result from marriage, may result from love, almost always result from sex. Children's Books: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 27% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. Coffee or cafe items: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 15% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. A prolific author is a machine where you put in coffee and get out manuscripts. Colonial America: see Romance Subgenres Commercial: see Romance Subgenres Contemporary: see Romance Subgenres Contract: in general, romance fiction is bought from an author by a publisher (sometimes hrough an agent) via a contract. The Contract almost always involves a cash advance, and then a royalty pay-out. Convenience: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #2 most important shopping factor for romance readers, in order of importance. Contrast: selection of books, price, help. Courtroom Drama: see Romance Subgenres Crime: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: D

Description on the back cover: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #1 most important selling point for readers when deciding what book to buy. See also: personal flip-through, word-of-mouth, author, price. Detective: see Romance Subgenres Divorced: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 10.7% of romance readers are divorced (7% in 1998). Contrast: married, single, widowed, separated. Drugstores: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites where 2% of romance readers purchase books.

Romance Definitions: E

E-commerce: see software, internet bookstore. England: see Romance Subgenres Espionage: see Romance Subgenres Exotic Locations: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: F

Fantasy: see Romance Subgenres Female: see woman. Fiction: a book, or a story in a book or a periodical. Contrast: nonfiction. Flip-through: see Personal flip-through. Formulaic Fiction: see Popular Literature Futuristic: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: G

Genre: see Romance Subgenres Genre Literature: see Popular Literature. Grocery stores: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites where 18% of romance readers purchase books. Many also buy food, beverages, and other retail items there.

Romance Definitions: H

Handsomeness: #1 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroes about whom they read (in 1998, was #2 in 2002), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, beauty, Muscle Bound, kindness, Strength of Character, and attractiveness. Hardcover: {to be done}. Contrast: paperback. Heart: the human organ capable of being broken, or the basis of love. See: lips. Help, or recommendation from bookstore staff: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, this is the #4 most important shopping factor for romance readers, in order of importance. Contrast: selection of books, price, convenience. Historical: see Romance Subgenres Hero: the leading man character in a romance. Contrast: Heroine. Heroine: the leading woman character in a romance. Contrast: Hero. Husband: the primary goal for the heroine in most romances. Unless she starts out married to the wrong one. Then a husband 2.0 model is to be substituted. See: divorce.

Romance Definitions: I

Inspirational: see Romance Subgenres Intelligence: #1 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroine about whom they read (in 2002 and in 1998), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. It is #3 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroes about whom they read (in 2002 and in 1998). See also: attractiveness, beauty, handsomeness, kindness, muscle bound, and strength of character. Internet Book Stores: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the way that 9% of romance readers purchase books. Amazon is the biggest Internet Book Stores, followed by #2 Barnes & Noble. See: e-commerce.

Romance Definitions: J

Jewelry: gold, silver, gems, rings, necklaces, and the like -- which a man inevitably gives a woman in a romance. See: Kiss.

Romance Definitions: K

Kindness: #2 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroes about whom they read (in 1998), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, beauty, Muscle Bound, Handsomeness, Strength of Character, and attractiveness. Kiss: something that men give to women, or vice versa, often indicating love, but less immediately expensive than jewelry. See: lips.

Romance Definitions: L

Legal Thriller: see Romance Subgenres Lips: human organs used to whistle, to sip, or to kiss. See: heart. Literary: see Romance Subgenres Love: the single most important word in romance. I can't possibly define it to you better than your favorite books -- or favorite people.

Romance Definitions: M

Magazines: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 40% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. Also called periodicals. Mail Ordering: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the way that 3% of romance readers purchase books. Mainstream: see Romance Subgenres Mall bookstores: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites where 33% of romance readers purchase books. Married: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 49.5% of romance readers are married (56% in 1998). Contrast: single, divorced, widowed. See also: wedding. Mass-market: {to be done} Mass merchandisers: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites such as Target or Walmart where 20% of romance readers purchase books. Medieval: see Romance Subgenres Men: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 7% of all romance readers are men. One in 50 North American men have read a romance novel in 2002. Merchandise: the other stuff besides romance books that a reader can buy in a bookstore. This includes: other fiction (see genres); nonfiction books; magazines; stationary or greeting cards; children's books; novelty books; software; coffee or cafe items. Muscle Bound: #1 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroes about whom they read (in 2002), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, beauty, handsomeness, kindness, Strength of Character, and attractiveness. Mystery: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: N

Nonfiction: contrast: fiction. Nonfiction: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 47% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. North American: in the book bsuiness, this means USA plus Canada. Novel: in the official definition of Science Fiction Writers of America, this is a work of fiction over 40,000 words in length. Contrast : short story, novella, novelette. Novella: in the official definition of Science Fiction Writers of America, this is a work of fiction 7,500 to 17,499 words in length. Contrast : short story, novelette, novel. Novelette: in the official definition of Science Fiction Writers of America, this is a work of fiction 17,499 to 40,000 words in length. Contrast : short story, novella, novel. Novelty Books: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 22% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction.

Romance Definitions: O

Other Fiction: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 66% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction.

Romance Definitions: P

Paperback: {to be done}. Contrast: Hardcover. Paranormal: see Romance Subgenres Periodical: a magazine. See also series romance. Personal flip-through: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #2 most important selling point for readers when deciding what book to buy. See also: description on the back cover, word-of-mouth, author, price. Police: see Romance Subgenres Popular Culture: "...the everyday world around us: the mass media, entertainments, diversions, heroes, icons, ritual, psychology, religion--our total life picture." [The Journal of Popular Culture] Celia Brayfield, a critic of popular culture, states "...popular culture circulates ideas for millions of people. These ideas are our modern mythology. They tell society how to survive. Society changes at a dizzying speed and a great many modern stories address the fears aroused by those changes". Popular Literature: "the literature which people really read. It is usually read for pleasure and written for profit. Popular literature is also called 'genre' literature or 'formulaic' fiction because it can be categorized into specific genres or formulas like the classic detective novel, gothic horror, or historical romance. Works of popular literature usually become 'best sellers' in contrast to more experimental or literary fiction. Critics of popular culture believe that popular literature reflects the culture in which it was written. Therefore, we can determine a culture's concerns by analyzing its best seller lists. Literature became 'popular', for the people, in the 18th century with the rise of the middle class, universal education, and the industrial revolution." Price: What the readers pays for a book. According to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #3 most important shopping factor for romance readers, in order of importance. Contrast: selection of books, convenience, help. Price: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #5 most important selling point for readers when deciding what book to buy. See also: description on the back cover, word-of-mouth, Personal flip-through, author. Publisher: see Romance Publishers

Romance Definitions: Q

Question: to "pop the question" is to ask: "will you marry me?"

Romance Definitions: R

Regency: see Romance Subgenres Ring: the essential magical device required for a proper wedding. See: jewelry. Romance: the primary genre of fiction. Romance Writers of America's Official Definition: "A romance is a book wherein the love story is the main focus of the novel, and the end of the book is emotionally satisfying." Contrast with "Women's Fiction Novel."

Romance Definitions: S

Science Fiction: see Romance Subgenres Scotland: see Romance Subgenres Selection of books: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #1 most important shopping factor for romance readers, in order of importance. Contrast: convenience, price, help. Separated: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 0.5% of romance readers are divorced (1% in 1998). Contrast: married, single, widowed, divorced. Series romance: a shorter paperback romance novel that is released as part of a numbered sequence and typically pubslihed by Harlequin/Silhouette, the largest publisher of series romance. A number indicating the place each book belongs in the series appears on the cover of each series book. Series romances are released in numbered order, and shelved monthly like a periodical -- with the previous month's titles being replaced by the next month's titles every few weeks. Contrast Single-title romance. Short Story: in the official definition of Science Fiction Writers of America, this is a work of fiction up to 7,499 words in length. Contrast : novella, novelette, novel. Single: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 33% of romance readers are single (23% in 1998). Contrast: married, divorced, widowed. Single-title romance: a romance, usually longer than a series romance, which is NOT released as part of a series. It is packaged and shelved like any mass-market paperback or hardback fiction book. Contrast series romance. Software: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 17% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. Authors also use word processing software to help produce their manuscripts. E-commerce software is also used by internet bookstores to sell books to romance readers. Software is also used by authors and their webmasters to create, post, and update their home pages on the internet. Stationary or greeting cards: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, such merchandise is purchased by 39% of romance readers when they're in a bookstore buying romance fiction. Story: stories come in different lengths, including: short story, novella, novelette, novel. Streetfront or stand-alone bookstores: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, are the sites such as Barnes & Noble where 7% of romance readers purchase books. Strength of Character: #2 of the top 3 character traits that romance readers like to see in the heroines about whom they read (in 2002; was #3 in 1998), according to Romance Writers of America statistics. See also: intelligence, beauty, handsomeness, kindness, muscle bound, and attractiveness. Suspense: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: T

Thriller: see Romance Subgenres Time Travel: see Romance Subgenres Traits: for character traits, see: muscle bound, intelligence, beauty, handsomeness, kindness, Strength of Character, and attractiveness Travel: see Romance Subgenres

Romance Definitions: U

Unwise: a hero who chases someone other than the herione, or a heroine who chases someone other than the hero.

Romance Definitions: V

Virgin: what the heroine always was, in older romance fiction, before she met her husband. Apparently not a requirement for men.

Romance Definitions: W

Wedding: the essential ritual in which a man and a woman are transformed into a husband and a wife. See: ring. Western: see Romance Subgenres Widowed: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 6% of romance readers are widowed (13% in 1998). Contrast: married, single, divorced. Wife: what the heroine wants to be, in conjunction with the proper husband, in most romance fiction. See: ring. Women: according to Romance Writers of America statistics, 93% of all romance readers are women. Women's Fiction Novel: "a book that focuses on relationships, but not necessarily a love-story relationship. It may center on, for example, family relationships, or friendships, or a love relationship, or all three. A woman's novel does not have to have an emotionally satisfying ending resulting from a positive resolution to a central love story. It may have a "happy ending" based on events unrelated to a love story, a 'bittersweet ending,' or even a tragic ending." Contrast with "Romance." Word-of-mouth: a recommendation made directly to the reader by another person. According to Romance Writers of America statistics, is the #3 most important selling point for readers when deciding what book to buy. See also: description on the back cover, personal flip-through, author, price.

Romance Definitions: X

X-ray: not the proper way to look into someone's heart, in a romance.

Romance Definitions: Y

Yes: the proper answer to The Question, if from the right person in a romance.

Romance Definitions: Z

Zero: the chances of true happiness between the hero and anyone but the heroine, and vice versa.

ROMANCE AUTHORS Table of Contents


Compiled by Magic Dragon Multimedia

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Copyright 2003 by Magic Dragon Multimedia.
All rights reserved Worldwide. May not be reproduced without permission.
May be posted electronically provided that it is transmitted unaltered, in its entirety, and without charge.