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SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY POETRY:
12.0 LAST MINUTE UNCOLLATED ADDITIONS
by
JONATHAN VOS POST

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12.0 LAST MINUTE UNCOLLATED ADDITIONS

[added beginning 13 Oct 93] Poul Anderson writes 9 Oct 93 that "Gordon Dickson has done science fiction and fantasy poetry. Robinson Jeffers was aware of and influenced by modern science, and a few of his poems draw directly on astronomy, geology, or evolutionary biology. The same is even more true of the Dane Johannes V. Jensen [translation attached of 'Grotte']. "Karen [Anderson]'s all too few verses of this kind are in our joint collection THE UNICORN TRADE, New York: Baen, 1984. Most of what verse I have written for publication -- some, naturally, has been for just one other pair of eyes -- has been worked into stories, for the simple reason that that's the only way to get a decent word rate for them. A great deal of [Poul Anderson's Shakespearean novel] A MIDSUMMER TEMPEST is in blank verse, and two rhyming poems also occur, set as prose. James Branch Cabell used that trick quite a bit, besides inserting explicit poetry. A collection of various [poems] of mine from assorted sources, STAVES, will be published shortly by Jwindz, a tiny house in Minneapolis, in connection with this year's world fantasy convention...." Examples of SF&F language I've selected from single books by various poets: FREDERICK TURNER, Between Two Lives, Middletown CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1972: As we can see in the holy dolphin Dancing in heraldic and ecstatic frieze. Poor beast, having only pain to lose And yet it would cling to the slow death Of five metric tons of pressure to the square inch [p.11] We must be protected against history By the cool smell of petrol, and the metal Of cars' walls, the accuracy of instruments. [p.14] The mountain of slag that sits on the magma The sick cavefuls of fire that must be abated and tamed. [p.19] The mountains are clouds of stone. The trees are chemical factories, with antennae, like the moth wings of a satellite, blindly searching the sun.... Only in motion, like the cupola of a hummingbird's ghostly wing, or the mystical track of an electron... [p.27] I saw the cosmos in the eyes of my new-born child. [p.29] My friends have discovered the elegant; they avoid large abstractions not only because such things are intellectually topheavy but also because they stink of power, they have frequencies that quickly could burn us out. [p.30] He will not let a baby escape that look of eternity in its eyes, will not let a flower escape the implications of its ringing millioning of molecules at atoms, its light-years of space between electrons, the forces in its mass that could move mountains." [p.32] the green dragon had just carried you away in the act of rescuing the damsels that had hatched from eggs on Mars... [p.32] Over the telephone and upon screens some kind of life will go on. Carried by lasers, messages will be improbably received. In a blue haze, machines will make palaces. [p.40] He is galvanized into strange energy. Like a dead thing, being riddled with bullets or shocked by a million volts.... For such a man the universe is never a proper fit. [p.48] It's all an illusion, just as reality is -- an electronic whisper that carries from one side of the universe to the other, like speaking in a dome... [p.51] Philosophy, losing its children, the sciences and the humanities, has, like an impotent mother, turned frigid and hard. Sterile and elegant, dressed in the latest fashion, sipping a cocktail..." [p.52] As a woman, who, bearing a child, is made over totally to a system inherent in her genes, so we mature along lines that cannot be denied... [p.54] yielded to the lassitude of gravity your whole life going in a straight line... [p.55] Marya (that's what we called her -- the real name like the nee' of the radium woman, quite unpronounceable) [p.61] an insufferable elegance standing in the heart of my cool world, surrounded by perfect figures, isosceles or hyperbolic... [p.65] Mama computer, how could I bear leaving New England this time of the year? [p.68] volcano, the outer cliffs bursting apart in fire, the white, actinic light pouring in shafts through the stone made transparent, the people of the village running in terror burnt by the radio-carbons, the curious spectrums of isotopes, skin cancers and genetic diseases. [72] At a certain point every system reaches some quantum completeness every harmonic included, so it acts on the world as a whole. [74] its scent is heady like honey; it forms echelons of stars, each hedge is a milky way. [85] Similarly, here are SF&F lines from The Poems of Richard Wilbur, New York: Harcourt Brace & World, 1963 (includes poems from 4 earlier volumes): Spare us all word of the weapons, their force and range, The long numbers that rocket the mind; Our slow, unreckoning hearts will be left behind, Unable to fear what is too strange. Nor shall you scare us with talk of the death of the race. How should we dream of this place without us?-- The sun mere fire, the leaves untroubled around us, A stone look on a stone's face? [p.6] Then burnt, bulldozed, they shall all be buried To the depth of diamonds, in the making dark [p.11] Columbus and his men, they say, Conveyed the virus hither Whereby my features rot away And vital powers wither... [p.44] Mind in its purest play is like some bat That beats about in caverns all alone, Contriving by a kind of senseless wit Not to conclude against a wall of stone. [p.72] Newtonian numbers set to cosmic lyres Whelmed us in whirling worlds we could not know, And by the imagined floods of our desires The voice of Sirens gave us vertigo. [p.75, "Lamarck Elaborated"] Wisely watch for the sight Of the supernova burgeoning over the barn... [p.117] There was perfection in the death of ferns Which laid their fragile cheeks against the stone A million years. Great mammoths overthrown Composedly have made their long sojourns, Like palaces of patience, in the gray And changeless lands of ice. And at Pompeii... [p.135] In spirals of the whelk's eternal shell The mind of Swedenborg to heaven flew, But found it such a mathematic hell That Emerson was damned if it would do. [p.143] Death of Sir Nihil, book the nth, Upon the charred and clotted sward, Lacking the lily of our Lord, Alases of the hyacinth. [p.177] He's gone. Tom Swift has vanished too, Who worked at none but wit's expense, Putting dirigibles together Out in the yard, in the quiet weather, Whistling behind Tom Sawyer's fence. [p.199] By actual wings, for wanting this repeal I should go whirling a thin Euclidean reel [p.212] Air is refreshment's treasury; earth seems Our history's faulted sink, and spring of love; And we between these dreamt-of empires move To coop infinity away from dreams. [p.218] A childhood by this fountain wondering Would leave impress of circle-mysteries: One would have faith that the unjustest thing Had geometric grace past what one sees. [p.223] Bibliography of SF&F Poetry by MICHAEL BISHOP (1 book, 45 poems/editions): Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977, 150 chapbooks of 13 poems; "An Echo Through the Timepiece", Georgia Review, Vol.22, No.4, Winter 1968; "An Echo Through the Timepiece", The Anthology of Speculative Poetry #3, 1977; "In the Lilliputian Asylum", Orbit 15, ed. Damon Knight, New York: Harper & Row, Oct. 1974; [a portion of this long poem appears in Windows & Mirrors as "Dissertation on the Burial Customs of the Lilliputians"] "White Power Poem", Bellevue WA: Bellevue Press, [postcard], 1976; "White Power Poem", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "White Power Poem", Burning with a Vision, Philadelphia: Owlswick, ed. Robert Frazier, 1984; "Postcards to Athena", Speculative Poetry Review #1, 1977; "Postcards to Athena", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Postcards to Athena", Burning with a Vision, Philadelphia: Owlswick, ed. Robert Frazier, 1984; "Planetarium", Speculative Poetry Review #2, 1977; "Planetarium", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "A Poem for My Daughter", Mythologies #12, June 1977; "A Poem for My Daughter", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Astyages' Dream, Which He Relates to the Magi", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Beads: The Eloquent Lover's Metaphysical Conceit", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Between Classes", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Definition", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "I Am a Slot Machine in the Shrine of Bosch", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Pulses From a Rented House", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Quilting in Winter", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "Silence for the Lady's Anger", Windows & Mirrors, Moravian Press, August 1977; "For the Lady of a Physicist", in Black Holes, ed. Jerry Pournelle, pub.?, date? "For the Lady of a Physicist", Rhysling Anthology, Rhysling Award Winner for Best Long Poem, year? "For the Lady of a Physicist", Pacific Quarterly, Moana, 1978; "For the Lady of a Physicist", in Blooded on Arachne, 1982; "For the Lady of a Physicist", Burning with a Vision, Philadelphia: Owlswick, ed. Robert Frazier, 1984; "ITH-CORO", The Anthology of Speculative Poetry #3, 1978; "ITH-CORO", The Umbral Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, ed. Steve Rasnic Tem, 1982; "Among the Hominids at Olduvai", The Anthology of Speculative Poetry #3, 1978; "Among the Hominids at Olduvai", in Blooded on Arachne, 1982; "Among the Hominids at Olduvai", The Umbral Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, ed. Steve Rasnic Tem, 1982; "My Berrocal", The Anthology of Speculative Poetry #3, 1978; "For the Lady of a Physicist 2", Shayol #4, Winter 1978; "The Vultures", The Anthology of Speculative Poetry #4, 1980; "The Vultures", The Umbral Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, ed. Steve Rasnic Tem, 1982; "Independence Day Forever", The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, July 1984; "Independence Day Forever", 1985 Rhysling Anthology; "(G)Astronomical Song for Sentience", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Sep. 1984; "To a Chimp Held Captive for Purposes of Research", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, January 1985; "To a Chimp Held Captive for Purposes of Research", Mark Zeising, 1988 [broadsheet]; "The Haint of the Redneck Immortal", Fantasy Macabre #8, 1986; "The Hunchback of Tulsa, Oklahoma", Twilight Zone, June 1988; "Virtually Unknown Until 1983", Star*Line, Vol.12, No.5, 1989; "Extinction", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Dec. 1991. Scott E. Green, SFWA and SFPA member, formerly State Assemblyman in Manchester, New Hampshire, has had poems appear in magazines including Aboriginal SF, Alpha Adventures, Amazing, Amazing Adventures, American Fantasy, Antithesis, Audiozine (on cassette), Beyond, Bleeding Virgin, Blood Review, Bloodrake, Dead of Night, Deathrealm, Dreams & Nightmares, Earthwise Newsletter, Eldritch Tales, Esit, Figment, Hardware, Haunts, Hubris, Infinitum, Isaac Asimov's, the Magazine of Speculative Poetry, Midnight Graffiti, Midnight Zoo, New Pathways, Night Voyages, The Nightmare Express, Not One of Us, Orion's Child, Owlflight, Pandora, Paradox, Scavenger's Newsletter, Shadows Of, Skewed, Sozoryoku, Space & Time, Star*Line, Sycophant, Tales of the Unanticipated, Today's Fantasy/Future Technology, The Old Stone Wall, Trajectories, Vision, Writer's Journal, Xenophilia, Z Miscellaneous He had poetry in anthologies including: Specula, Beech Grove IN: Talisman, 1993; 1991 Rhysling Anthology; 1993 Rhysling Anthology; Project Solar Sail, New York: Roc, 1990; Aliens and Lovers, Oakland CA: Unique Graphics, 1983; Beneath Twin Moons, Chula Vista CA: Running Dinosaur, 1990; Lost Lands, Chula Vista CA: Running Dinosaur, 1982; A Walk in the Dark, Chula Vista CA: Running Dinosaur, 1985; Fantastic Realms, Chula Vista CA: Running Dinosaur, 1992; and The First Annual Variable, Huntsville AK: POOA, 1984. His single-author collections include Baby Sale at the 7-11, Newark NJ: Bloom, 1984; and Private Worlds, Woburn MA: Bedouin Press, 1983. He edited Star/Sword Poetry Chapbook 1, was Poet Guest of Honor at BASH 1984 (and had a poem in their program book, Boston, 1984) He reminds me to add Esther Leycer (sp?) who earned $100,000 from poetry in one year. John Brunner writes (25 Oct 93) "... Don't forget the lost-race element in [Carl] Sandberg's 'Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind.' I once gave an SF poetry reading at the Poetry Society in London and had no trouble filling two hours without searching anywhere more exotic than the [Judith] Merril anthologies and my own poetry shelves. (The first ecology poem? Gordon Bottomly's 'To Ironfounders and Others'. Check it out.) I also used Stephen Vincent Benet's 'Nightmare Number Three.' ... Oh -- and don't overlook Lawrence Lerner's marveollous 'A.R.T.H.U.R.' ... and 'Human Pie' by Jeni Couzyn. My own ventures into SF poetry are scattered. I wouldn't know how to compile an exhaustive list. They also include folksong parodies and limericks. No doubt someone out there remembers more than I do... Luck with your task..." Mr.Brunner is right about Gordon Bottomley, whom I have cited in previous essays, and whose 1874 poem has amazing lines such as: "Your worship is your furnaces, Which, like old idols, lost obscenes, Have molten bowels; your vision is Machines for making more machines." Shiela Finch (postmark 28 Oct 93) lists her SF poems as including: "Message to a Friend in Another Solar System," Aurora, Winter 1983; and "The Eagle on the Washing Machine", Ball State Forum, Summer 1973. Jeffrey G. Liss (23 Oct 93) lists SF poems including: "Crystal Dreams", Star*Line, Jan. 1993; "The Passing in the Night", Spacelines, Dec. 1989; "Grand Finale", Stone Leader, 1956; "Skyward Bound", Stone Leader, April 1955. He adds "as to your article, your scholarship in this area certainly exceeds that of mine. My only personal observation is that I prefer a style that is a little less a series of micro-brief allusions and is a little more straightforward explanation. On the other hand, you are writing only a single article, not an entire encyclopedia." Anne McCaffrey reminds me (postmarked 19 Oct 93) to add SFWA members Virginia Kidd and Carol Emshwiller, and notes that her own verse appears in Dragonflight, Ballantine, 1969; and Dragonsong, Atheneum, 1975. She also used John Updike's poetry (with permission) in Alchemy and Academe. Pamela Sargent writes (17 Nov 1993) to note that she included poems by Sonya Dorman in Women of Wonder, Vintage, 1975, and in The New Women of Wonder, Vintage, 1978. She included poems by Tom Disch and Robert Frazier in Afterlives, Vintage, 1986, which she edited with Ian Watson. Also, George Zebrowski had a poem of his own, ostensibly written by the character Richard Bulero, in the his novel Macrolife, Harper & Row, 1979. During the joint editorship of Pamela Sargent and George Zebrowski of the SFWA Bulletin, there were occasional poems published. The complete list is: "e: Mnemonic to the Base of natural Logarithms", Jonathan V. Post, Vol.17, No.2, Summer 1983 "(evolution quotella)" and "Haiku for the Stanford Cyclotron", Robert Frazier, Vol.18, No.2, Summer 1984 "In Memory of Frank Herbert, 1920-1986", David Lunde, Vol.20, No.1, Spring 1986 "Astronomy has become the hottest growth stock in science", a quotella by Robert Frazier, Vol.20, No.1, Spring 1986 "The Brink of Glory" and "Newton at Sea", Thomas A. Easton, Vol.21, No.4, Winter 1987 "Petrified Music", Andrew Joron, Vol.25, No.1, Spring 1991. She also comments that Rhysling Award winning poems have appeared in the first Nebula Awards anthology edited by Joe Haldeman, the first one edited by George Zebrowski (#20), the volumes edited by Michael Bishop and by James Morrow, and will be in the next three (edited by Pamela Sargent). Geoffrey A. Landis writes (16 Oct 93) that his SF&F Poetry bibliography is: "To Live in Hell", Pandora, No.17, 1987; "To Live in Hell", Myths, Legends & True History: Authors Choice 26, Pulphouse, 1991; "Gorgozak", Haunts, No.13/14, 1988; "Gorgozak", Timeframes, Rune Press, 1991; "Elephant Bits", ArtCrimes, No.9, Fall 1989; "Elephant Bits", Coventry Reader, Dec. 1990; "Oak and Ivory", Star*Line, Sep/Dec. 1989; "Oak and Ivory", Timeframes, Rune Press, 1991; "Kittens in Space", Star*Line, May 1990; "The Einstein We Never Knew", Asimov's, July 1990; "The Einstein We Never Knew", Rhysling Anthology, 1991; "The Einstein We Never Knew", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "Singularity", Star*Line, July/Sep 1990; "Singularity", in story "Impact Parameter", Asimov's, Aug. 1992; "The City of Fat & Jolly Poets", Amazing, Nov. 1990; "The City of Fat & Jolly Poets", Icon, Spring 1990; "The City of Fat & Jolly Poets", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "A Month of Sundays", Aboriginal SF, Mar/Apr 1991; "& June & Croon", Asimov's, May 1991; "& June & Croon", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "Across Starry Darkness to Remember", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "Across Starry Darkness to Remember", Pulphouse, to be published; "God Contemplating Saint Augustine...", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "Forever", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "Requisient in Pace", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "A Long Time Dying", Fantasy & Science Fiction, Aug. 1991; "A Long Time Dying", Rhysling Anthology, 1992; "A Long Time Dying", Myths, Legends & True History: Authors Choice 26, Pulphouse, 1991; "In the Future They Will Get Us", Pulphouse, 26 Nov. 1991; "In the Future They Will Get Us", Coventry Reader, Spring 1991; "Albert and Mileva", Aboriginal SF, Summer 1992; "Albert and Mileva", TimeFrames, Rune Press, 1991; "The Surface of Venus", Asimov's, March 1993; "If Angels Ate Apples", Asimov's, July 1993; "The City Burned", Asimov's, August 1993; "Fantasy Heroes...", Star*Line, April 1993; "The Era of Cyberspace", Vision-21 Proceedings, to be published. Jack L. Chalker points out in the bibliographic appendix to his short story collection Dance Band on the Titanic (New York: Del Rey, 1988): "In Memorium: Clark Ashton Smith, Anthem, 1963 [edited by Jack L. Chalker] ... containing some Smith material never published anywhere else, including a complete play in blank verse set in Zothique ... [and] a memorial poem (also never published elsewhere) by Theodore Sturgeon..." This adds to the bibliography of Clark Ashton Smith's poetry, and for the first time compels me to add Theodore Sturgeon to the list of Science Fiction Authors who also write genre poetry [must add to p.18 list]. Brian W. Aldiss writes, 8 Dec 1993, that Mark Rich will publish a volume or chapbook of Mr. Aldiss' Selected Poems in March 1994, entitled At The Caligula Hotel. He also updates the Poetry section of The Work of Brian W. Aldiss: An Annotated Bibliography & Guide, by Margaret Aldiss, San Bernadino CA: The Borgo Press, 1992, cloth], and notes "You'll see that one or two poems have appeared in quite important sources, The London Times, the TLS [Times Literary Supplement], the Keats-Shelley Review, and the Oxford Book of Light Verse." [NOTE: Barefoot in the Head contains roughly 50 poems and "lyrics"; only those which have been subsequently published elsewhere are included in this list.] Update follows: D1. "The Sacred Carving", New Poems 2, 1955, p.10. D2. "Space Burial", The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Vol.17, July 1959, p.73. b. The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction, Ninth Series, ed. Anthony Boucher, Garden City NY: Doubleday & Co., cloth, p.? c. Burning with a Vision: Poetry of Science and the Fantastic, ed. Robert Frazier, Philadelphia: Owlswick Press, 1984, cloth, p.8., d. Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.155. [this book listed as E40 in Borgo] D3. "To My Third Child", Daily Telegraph Magazine, 27 March 1960. D4. "Aldiss's Sexual Survey of Habits in Our Little-Explored System", PITFCS, No.138, Dec.1960, p.13, ten galactic limericks. b. as "Limericks", 5 non-bylined poems, Playboy's Book of Limericks, ed. Clifford Crist, Chicago: Playboy Press, 1972, paper, pp.138, 143, 154, 183, 197. D5. "There Are No More Good Stories About Mars Because We Need No More Good Stories About Mars", The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Vol.24, June 1963, p.127. D6. "Progression of the Species", Priapus, No.8, 1967, p.24. b. Holding Your Eight Hands: An Anthology of Science Fiction Verse, ed. Edward Lucie-Smith, Garden City NY: Doubleday & Co., 1969, cloth, p.1. c. Best SF: 1969, ed. Harry Harrison & Brian W. Aldiss, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1970, cloth, p.123. d. The Year's Best Science Fiction 3, ed. Harry Harrison & Brian W. Aldiss, London: Sphere Books, 1970, paper, p.111. e. Best SF: 1969, ed. Harry Harrison & Brian W. Aldiss, New York: Berkley Medallion, 1971, paper, p.?. f. Headway: A Thematic Reader, ed. Lois A. Michel, New York: Holt Rinehart & Winston, 1970, paper, p.238. g. as " ," in Galaktika, No.2, 1972, p.30, [Hungarian]. h. SF: Inventing the Future, ed. ?, Toronto: Belhaven, 1972, cloth, p.? i. Fine Frenzy, ed. Baylor Stokes, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1972, cloth?, p.? j. The Umbral Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, ed. Steve Rasnic Tem, Denver CO: Umbral Press, 1982, paper, p.68. k. New Angles, Book 2, ed. John Foster, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987, cloth, p.116. l. Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.44. [this book listed as E40 in Borgo] D7. "Biography", Priapus, No.13, 1968, p.?. D8. "His Prowed Course", Queen, 8 Jan 1969, p.23. [from Barefoot...] D9. "Time Never Goes By", Queen, 8 Jan 1969, p.23. [from Barefoot...] D10. "Living: Being: Having", an epic in Haiku, Priapus, No.21, 1971, p.9. [from Barefoot...] D11. "The Ambidextrous Universe", Priapus, No.21, 1971, p.15. D12. "Chinese Cinema-Owner, Medan, 1945", The Times [of London], 24 Dec 1971, p.? D13. "Summer 1773", one of a set of postcard poems, ed. Jack Dann, Binghamton NY: Bellveue [sic] Press, 1972, one postcard. b. as "Tom Wedgwood Confesses", The New Oxford Book of Light Verse, ed. Kingsley Amis, London: Oxford University Press, 1978, p.213. D14. "Homage to the Early Pound", Zimri, No.5, Aug.1973, pp.6-9, comprising the 8 individual poems: "Innovation in the Arts", "At the Julius Caesar Hotel", "A Moment of Suspense", "While Feeding Parrots November 9", "Beatitudes", "Exit Aquascutum", "Creation", "Rejection Slip by Dowson". b. "At the Julius Caesar Hotel" as "At the Caligula Hotel", Science Fiction Blues Programme Book, London: Avernus, 1987, paper, p.8. c. plus ?? "Homage to a Lady Literary Agent", "Drama on the River Cherwell", "In Another Town: Bologna", The Purple Hours, ed. Lisa Conesa, privately printed, Manchester, 1974, pp.1-6. D15. "Is Uranus Bigger than Mars?", comprising 12 limericks, Penthouse (U.K.), Vol.9, 1974,p.37. D.16. "Reviews of Three Science Fantasies", comprising three poems, Zimri, No.6, May 1974, p.40. D17. "Limerick", New Statesman, 6 April 1979, p.494, [won a NS competition]. D18. "Clerihew", New Statesman, 16 May 1979, p.195, [won a NS competition]. D19. "The Peasant", China Now, March/April 1980, p.17. D20. "Ninevah: Urban Traumas", Lifeline, No.1, 1981, p.4. D21. "Thomas Hardy Considers the Newly Published Special Theory of Relativity", The Times Literary Supplement, 25 Sep 1981, p.1097. b. Burning with a Vision: Poetry of Science and the Fantastic, ed. Robert Frazier, Philadelphia PA: Owlswick Press, 1984, cloth, p.9. c. The Magazine of Speculative Poetry, No.2, Apr/June 1987, p.12. d. Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.157. D22. "Destruction of the Fifth Planet", Star*Line, Vol.?, No.?, 1982, p.11. b. Burning with a Vision: Poetry of Science and the Fantastic, ed. Robert Frazier, Philadelphia PA: Owlswick Press, 1984, cloth, p.10. c. Sirius, No.123, 1986, p.95. d. Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.150. D23. "Sleep", Star*Line, Vol.6, No.?, 1983, p.?. D24. "Bridging Hour in Wesciv", Burning with a Vision: Poetry of Science and the Fantastic, ed. Robert Frazier, Philadelphia: Owlswick Press, 1984, cloth, p.8., [from Barefoot...] D25. "The Light", The Magazine of Speculative Poetry, April/June 1987, p.12. D26. "Rhine Locks are Closed in Battle Against Poison", Science Fiction Blues Programme Book, London: Avernus, 1987, paper, p.9. D27. "The Cat Improvement Company", Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, pp.42-43. [this book listed as E40 in Borgo] b. The Magazine of Speculative Poetry, Oct/Dec 1988, [see also E27] D28. "Don't Go to Jupiter, Don't Go to Mars", Science Fiction Blues, by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, pp.39-40. [this book listed as E40 in Borgo] D29. "The Twentieth Camp", P.E.N. New Poetry II, ed. Elaine Feinstein, London: Quartet Books, 1988, paper, p.10. D30. "Star-Time", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.9. [from Barefoot...] b. The Magazine of Speculative Poetry, Jan 1989, [originally published in Brothers of the Head, A67] D31. "The Lying Truth", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.149. D32. "The Expanding Universe", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.151. D33. "Bacterial Action", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.152. D34. "To a Triceratops Skull in the British Museum", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.153. D35. "Femalien", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.154. D36. "Taking Leave of a Northern Institution", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, p.156. D37. "Parting Late in Life", Science Fiction Blues, London: Avernus, 1988, paper, pp.158-159. D38. "Dirge of Objects", Pataphysics, 1990, unpaginated. D39. "Lunar Astronomy", Colours of a New Day: Writing for South Africa, ed. Sarah Lefanu and Stephen Hayward, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1990, cloth, p.190. b. New York: Pantheon, 1990, paper, p.190. c. Johannesburg: Raven, 1990, paper, p.190. d. Ibadan: Spectrum Books, 1990, paper, p.190 e. Harmondsworth Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1991, paper, p.190. f. Calcutta: Seagull Books, 1991, paper, p.190. D40. "Mary in Italy", by Mary Shelley, arranged by Brian W. Aldiss [hypertext poetry!], Keats-Shelley Review, No.5, Autumn 1990, p.75. b. The Magazine of Speculative Poetry, Vol.3, No.3, Spring 1992, p.4. D41. "To Sam", Bodily Functions by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1991, cloth, p.3. [the dedicatory poem in this celebratory volume]. D42. "Envoi", Bodily Functions by Brian W. Aldiss, London: Avernus, 1991, cloth, pp.105-106. D43. "Where Have You Been?", Cat World, No.160, June 1991, p.31, the 1st of a series of cat poems, to be run in this magazine for 10 months, part of a collection "to be published in 1992". D44. "Heatwave", Cat World, No.161, July 1991, p.38. D45. "Snacks", Cat World, No.162, Aug. 1991, p.14. D46. "Foxie", Cat World, No.163, Sep. 1991, p.38. D47. ???, Cat World, No.164, Oct 1991, p.38. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.? D48. ???, Cat World, No.165, Nov. 1991, p.?. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.? D49. "Yum-Yum", Cat World, No.166, Dec. 1991, p.35. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.17. D50. "Rice Pudding", Now We Are Sick, ed. Neil Gaiman & Stephen Jones, Minneapolis MN: DreamHaven Books, 1991, cloth, p.34. D51. "Jackson", Cat World, No.167, Jan. 1992, p.?. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.23. D52. "Relating to the Pet", Cat World, No.168, Feb. 1992, p.17. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.58. D53. "A Riddle", Cat World, No.169, Mar. 1992, p.37. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.45. D54. "Portrait of a Cat with Lady", Cat World, No.170, Apr. 1992, p.23. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.36. D53. "The Two-Kitten Problem", Cat World, No.171, May 1992, p.30. b. Home Life with Cats, London: Grafton, 1992, cloth, p.29. D56. "What Did the Policeman Say?", In Memorium PKD, The Philip K. Dick Society Newsletter, No.29, Sep.1992, p.1. Joe Haldeman provides the following Poetry Bibliography, as of December 1993: "Saul's Death" [two sestinas/story), Omni, Feb. 1983; "Saul's Death", Dealing in Futures [anthology], date?; "Saul's Death", The Rhysling Anthology, date?, and won the Rhysling Award for Best SF Poem of the Year; "Saul's Death", Men at War [anthology], ed. J.Pournelle, 1984; "Saul's Death", Nebula Awards Twenty [anthology], 1985; "Saul's Death", There Will Be War [anthology], ed. J.Pournelle, 1983; "Saul's Death", Nebula 20 [anthology], ed. Zebrowski, 1985 [same as Nebula Awards Twenty ???; "Saul's Death", as "Saulova Smrt: Dvije Sestine", Sirius [Polish], 1988; "The Big Bang Theory Explained (In Light Verse)" [humor], Pulpsmith, Spring 1983; "The Big Bang Theory Explained (In Light Verse)" [humor], Dealing in Futures [anthology]; "Houston, Can You Read" [villanelle], Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Dec. 1983; "Curves in Space", Velocities, Summer 1984; "Machines of Loving Grace", Harper's letter column, May 1985; "Machines of Loving Grace", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Dec.1986; "DX", [long narrative poem], In the Fields of Fire [anthology], ed. Jack Dann, 1986; "DX", [long narrative poem], The Year's Best Fantasy [anthology], ed. Terri Windling, 1988; "The Gift", Dealing in Futures [anthology], date?; "The Gift", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Month? 1986; "Benny's Song", Pulpsmith, Vol.6, No.2, Summer 1986; "Benny's Song", Worlds Enough and Time [novel], by Joe Haldeman, date?; "Triolet: Lupa", Twilight Zone, June 1988; "Time Lapse" [long narrative poem], Blood is Not Enough [anthology], Morrow, 1989; "Time Lapse", Vampiros [Spanish], RobinBook, 1991; "Time Lapse", Ei Vain Veresta [Finnish], Kustannkus Oy Jalava, Helsinki, 1990; "Time Lapse", Vampiri [Italian], Mondadori, 1992; "Time Lapse", Blood is Not Enough [Japanese], Konashi, 1993; "The Star", Star*Line, Sep/Dec 1989; "pantoum: ad astra", Star*Line, Jan/Feb 1990; "Readers' Digest Condensed Haiku" [four short poems], Star*Line, Jan/Feb 1990; "The Star" [Petrachan sonnet + rubaiyat], Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, July 1990; "Eighteen Years Old, October Eleventh", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Aug. 1990; "Eighteen Years Old, October Eleventh", Rhysling Award Anthology [?], won Rhysling Award for Best Short Poem; "Eighteen Years Old, October Eleventh", Nebula Awards 27 [Anthology], Harcourt Brace, May 1993; "The Cepheid Variable", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Sep.1990; "The SF Editor's lament" [poem listed as story], Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Feb.1991; "The SF Editor's lament" [performed on audio cassette], Limelight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "The Homecoming" [narrative poem], Confiction Program Book, Aug.1990; "The Homecoming", Fires of the Past [anthology], St.Martin's, 1991; "For Chesley Bonestell", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Apr.1991; "The Number of the Man", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Jun.1991; "The Ballad of Orbital Hubris" [song performed on audio cassette], Spotlight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "The Locked-Up-in-a-Spaceship-for-a-Year-Without-No-Women Blues" [song performed on audio cassette], Spotlight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "A War for Ratings" [song performed on audio cassette], Spotlight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "The Ballad of Stan Long" [song performed on audio cassette], Spotlight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "The Ballad of Elvis Presley's Sexual Orientation (as Told Through the Headlines of The National Enquirer" [song performed on audio cassette], Limelight, Firebird Arts & Music, Portland, 1991; "Carbon Star", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Oct.1991; "I wonder what the vintner buys", Tampa Literary Supplement, 15 March 1992; "October Fog", Poetpourri, Fall 1992; "Solo", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, May 1993, p.9; "Market Day" [prose poem], Aboriginal Science Fiction Magazine, Fall 1993; "Astrology Column", Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, to appear; "Fire, Ice" [story told as sonnet redoublé], Omni, to appear; Ursula K. LeGuin writes 4 January 1994 to say: "...You certainly have done a big, careful job. I feel so incompetant in this area -- I have never been able to define 'science fiction poetry' to my own satisfaction -- that I am unable to offer any useful suggestions for your article. I can't think of anybody you've left out...." and she lists the following genre books and chapbooks: Wild Angels, [chapbook], Capra, 1974; Walking in Cornwall, [chapbook], n.p., 1976; Tillai and Tylissos, by Ursula K. LeGuin & Theodora Kroeber [chapbook], Red Bull, 1979; Hard Words, [Hardcover & Paperback], Harper & Row, 1988; In the Red Zone, [chapbook with artist Henk Pander], Lord John, 1983; Wild Oats and Fireweed, [Hardcover & Paperback], Harper & Row, 1988; No Boats, [chapbook], Ygor and Buntho Make Books, 1992; Blue Moon Over Thurman Street, [Paperback with photographer Roger Dorband], NewSage, 1993; Going Out With Peacocks, [forthcoming Hardcover & Paperback], HarperCollins, 1994; "There is also a substantial amount of poetry in Always Coming Home, Harper & Row, 1985. There is a fair number of uncollected poems in periodicals since the 1950s, but I do not have a list of them. I think you have all my Star*Line publications...."

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